STORIES FROM STEAM MEN


| March/April 1964

  • Model Steam Engine
    Here is a picture of a model steam engine at the Rollag Reunion, Sept. 30 th to October 2nd, 1955.
  • Advance Rumely Engine
    Here is a picture of my model Advance Rumely engine made entirely with the aid of the Farm Album pictures. It works well and is certainly a nice little bit of 'America.' The headlight is an oil burner and is complete.
  • 16 HP Peerless engine
    This picture of a 16 HP Peerless engine, No. 10640, owned by A. G. Henry, Fayetteville, Pa. was taken Sept. 12, 1958 at the Maryland Reunion, Upperco, Maryland.
  • Nichols & Shepard Separator
    In parts of the country threshing the grain out of stacks the so called Wing Carrier feeders were in common use some years back. This is a Nichols & Shepard separator with a Garden City wing carrier feeder.
  • Traction Engine
    Here is a picture of a showman's traction engine made by Charles Burrell & Son, Thetford, Norfolk, England. This is a cross compound engine. Cylinders are arranged something like the compound reeves engine. The engine is shown driving the round about at a

  • Model Steam Engine
  • Advance Rumely Engine
  • 16 HP Peerless engine
  • Nichols & Shepard Separator
  • Traction Engine

18 W. Wash. St., Newnan, Ga.

My earliest memories of steam go back to where a Watertown Portable blew up about 1882. The fireman was getting a drink of water on the other side of the Ginn house so no one was injured. He had just said the day before, 'I'll fire her or burst her'.

Some of the next ones I guess the first time I ever saw a real hot fire was when an old loco engineer would let the town kids ride with him while he was switching out cars.

The bark of steam engines could be heard all over the place pulling sawmills, running plainers, cotton ginns and the smoke from the large plants boiled out of the high stacks and only the machinery could be heard as most places used large Corliss engines.



This was a country of lumber, cotton, and cotton mills, and it is said we used 14 cars of coal a day in our little of 6000 before the electricity came.

My old friend Lew Steadman told me that he and his fireman decided to keep up steam one night when it would always go down, 4 boilers, 1 Corliss engine with a 75 psi back pressure so as to run the paper mill with exhaust. he had learned to dust the shovel off while firing from a railroad friend fireman, Lew took 2 boilers and his fireman took 2 and they began to throw the coal and each time hit the door with a loaded shovel causing the coal to form a dust and burn before it came down to the grates. Things looked good for a while as they had her popping off most of the time so they looked at each other and decided this was the way to fire until the town chief tapped him on the shoulder and invited him to look at the 130 ft. steel smoke stack outside. She was red hot half way up and people from everywhere were waiting to see the show of it falling down.