Straw Spark Arresters and Firing with Straw


| November/December 1958



4 hp. steam saw rig

4 hp. steam saw rig. Owned by O. W. Nord and son Peter, R. D. 1, Savage, Minnesota. Looks like a clever outfit. Elmer would be happy play with this one

New Rockford Flying Service, New Rockford, North Dakota

I DO NOT REMEMBER seeing more than one reply to your question on page 8 of the March-April ALBUM about the big spark arrester on the Case engine. The letter of Harry G. Yates did not give much information on it.

I have a copy of American Threshermen, October, 1907, in it is an ad for the 'United States Spark Arrester,' K. M. Colquhoun, Box 359, Minneapolis, Minn. 'The only arrester made that in no wise stops the draft.' Made in twelve styles and sizes.

The picture of it is enough like the one in the ALBUM that I am sure it must be one of the twelve models, this one is larger in diameter in relation to its height than the one in the ALBUM. It has the same kind of hinged cap in the center, only it looks smaller in relation to the whole arrester.

I have burned straw in engines more than coal, have seen many types of spark arresters but never one like this one. The ones that I have used were just screen caps of various shapes, and unless conditions were very dry a lot of the time we did not have one at all, in fact the Advance 30 hp. cross compound did not have one at all, and a 35 hp. Advance tandem-compound had only the cylindrical part, the top was wide open. Of course compound engines with a milder exhaust did not throw sparks too bad. But to see them working after dark you would think there was great danger of setting fire.

After receiving the above letter I wrote to Mr. Aslakson with the explanation the folks were not so much interested in the make of the spark arrester but why they had such a 'Bogwamus' of a thins: on a smoke stack. I asked him if he would not give us a letter on straw spark arresters or something on firing with straw.