THE 1952 REUNION OF THE NATIONAL THRESHERS ASSOCIATION, INC.


| September/October 1952



20 HP Advance-Rumely

20 hp. Advance-Rumely of Roe Volmer, R. D. 3, Bellevue, Ohio. Roe farms and works for the Nickel Plate Railroad as a boiler maker. He will be able to keep that Baby's boiler in good condition.

As Rev. and Mrs. Ritzman pull out of our yard the Sunday morning after the reunion, Mr .Ritzman said to me, 'Now you know what you have to do.' My heart sank as I realized that for the fourth time I was supposed to send a write-up in for the ALBUM( almost before I had gotten my breath after the doings.

Before this appears in the ALBUM, I shall have sent all members of the National a complete write-up which has appeared in one of the local papers. But for those ALBUM readers who are not N. T. A. members, here is a brief overall picture.

The 1952 reunion of the National Threshers Association began Thursday morning, June 26, with three chartered Greyhound buses converging on the Blaker farm, Alvordton, Ohio, bound for Ford's Museum and Greenfield Village. In addition, five auto loads of eager visitors left from here, and many others in Ohio and Southern Michigan drove their own cars over. For many, it was their first visit to this world famous shrine of early Americana, and at night upon their return to the farm, many declared their desire to spend much more than a day visiting the museum and village. It was truly a successful excursion and provided an auspirious opening of the reunion.

The actual reunion got under way Friday morning, without a drop of the customary rain. Although other localities have had rain, northern Ohio was so dry that all would have welcomed at least a shower to relieve the heat and dust.

This year we had provided more room for the exhibits, and four tents were erected for various purposes. We also had planned for more eating arrangements, and three lunch stands served very adequately the large crowds.

Chief interest in the reunions centers, of course, in the engines, large and small. The large ones wore dwarfed by Louis David's Avery Under mounted, brought just the preceding week from western Nebraska.