THE 1967 OLD TIME THRESHER AND SAW MILL OPERATOR SHOW


| July/August 1968

  • 25 HP Russell engine
    25 HP Russell engine owned by Percy Sherman of Palmyra, Michigan plowing at the 1967 Old Time Thresher Show. Photo by Leo R. Clark.
    Leo Clark
  • Advance-Rumely engine
    Photo by Leo Clark, 105 Harvey St., Washington, Illinois. Wickie Jones and Charles Barker of Lexington, Kentucky plowing with an Advance-Rumely engine at the 1967 Old Time Thresher Show.
    Leo Clark
  • 20 HP Rumely engine
    20 HP Rumely engine pulling the sight-seeing wagon at the Old Time Thresher Show in 1967. Photo by Leo R. Clark, 105 Harvey St., Washington, Illinois.
    Leo Clark
  • Old Time Thresher Show
    Mrs. Don Conwell and daughter, Becky, of Huntingdon, Indiana being (???) taken into custody by the ''Keystone Kops'' at the 1967 Old Time Thresher Show. Photo by Leo R. Clark, 105 Harvey St., Washington, Illinois.
    Leo Clark
  • Russell engine
    Greyhound and Russell engines threshing wheat at the 1967 Old Time Thresher Show. Photo by Ernest Hoffer, 444 Starr Ave., Toledo, Ohio.
    Ernest Hoffer
  • John Goodison engine
    John Goodison engine built at Sarnia, Ontario, Canada seen at the 1967 Old Time Thresher Show. Photo by Ernest Hoffer, 444 Starr Ave., Toledo, Ohio.
    Ernest Hoffer

  • 25 HP Russell engine
  • Advance-Rumely engine
  • 20 HP Rumely engine
  • Old Time Thresher Show
  • Russell engine
  • John Goodison engine

633 Cleveland Street, Decatur, Indiana 46733

During the month of August each year, one of the most looked forward to events takes place on the Jim Whitbey farm which is, of course, the 'Old Time Thresher and Saw Mill Operator Show.

The extreme popularity of this show is due to the fact that the visitor is well entertained by a well planned and scheduled program of events; starting at 10:00 o'clock each morning and continuing through the rest of the day and well into the evening hours.

Starting early in the spring, preparations for the forth coming 'Old Time Threshers Show' are taking place. From this time, until show time, the 'Working Dozen' are on hand at various times getting the grounds and equipment in shape for show time. Proof of this is shown by the clockwork like manner in which the different events take place at their assigned times during each days scheduled program of events. For those performing at each event, know that their jobs have been well done by looking at the satisfied expressions on the visitors faces.



What did the visitor see to cause those expressions? He saw logs made into lumber on the saw mill that was powered by the different steam engines. Close by, he saw the model sawmill in operation and being powered by several of the model engines. These models, by the way, were exact duplicates of their bigger brothers. Next in line, the veneer mill where a thin slice of wood was shaved from a log very similar to the way that it is done in the modern mills of to-day. This veneer is highly prized as a souvenir of the 'Old Time Thresher Show', as not a scrap is left when the show is over.

Always a popular feature of the show is the threshing of grain. The different methods of grain separation featured the chaffer which just separated the grain and chaff from the straw by means of an agitating rack. This chaffer, by the way. was powered by an old time horsepower, a team of ponies belonging to a close neighbor, furnishing the power. Nearby, a model hand-feed thresher was seen in operation and was powered by the many model engines on the grounds. Common to this model hand feed and a full sized one located at a different place on the grounds, the grain was separated and cleaned from the chaff and straw and measured in peck or half bushel containers while the straw and chaff was elevated from the rear of the machine by means of a web stacker. The next and final method of threshing was that of the modern grain separator, these being powered by the different steam engines and big gas tractors on the grounds.



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