THE ADVANCE CROSS COMPOUND ENGINE


| September/October 1954


Salina, Kansas

Early in the 1900's, the grazing industry in Texas, Kansas and other plain states was rapidly changing to agriculture. Large tracts of land were owned by individuals. Horses were not there and had they been there, many years would have been required to develop that vast area. The times demanded it be brought quickly into cultivation. The steam traction, engine was the only other power.

Advance Thresher Co., and other thresher companies sold many standard engines to hasten the plowing and development of thousands of acres of buffalo grass sod.

The gears on Advance engines, then, were cast and counter shafts small, having been made for light traction work. Neither the gears nor the shafts, then, were sufficiently strong to withstand the strain of plowing buffalo grass sod.



In 1905, faces of bull gears and bull pinions on 22 and 26 hp. engines were increased to 5' and were semi-steel. Counter shafts were larger. In 1907, 22 and 26 hp. engines were equipped with semi-steel bull gears and pinions with 6' faces, removable sleeves in hubs of drive wheels and larger brackets.

In the early 1900's standard engines properly operated, did good work in cultivated land. Fields of several hundred acres, were plowed with little trouble and small expense.














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