THE GALICK BROTHERS & THE OSGOOD No. 985


| May/June 1986



#Picture 01

Covered with brush, 7/4/85.

Over The Hill Trucks 3 Haywood Avenue Rutland, Vermont 05701

Our principal interest, as our trade name indicates, is antique trucks. For nearly three years Bob Giddings and I have followed up on countless leads as we journeyed through the Vermont countryside searching for old trucks. During the late winter of 1985 I was talking with a farmer from Benson about the likelihood of finding any chain driven trucks in the area. The only one which he could remember was an International 'high wheeler', which hauled canned milk from farms in the area. As he recalled, on one steep hill, the driver had to unload the cans of milk, since the small truck didn't have power enough to make the grade. He would then drive the truck to the top of the hill, and then carry the milk cans up to the truck.

However, that truck had long since disappeared. The farmer went on to say, that if there were any chain drives left in the area, the Galick's of West Haven would have them. So I made a note of this particular lead, and decided to wait until the snow had melted, the mud had dried, and the temperatures were a little milder before I would check it out.

As it turned out, I made my first trip to the Galick Brothers' farm on July 4, 1985. It took me awhile to locate the farm, since the only practical way to get there was to travel some distance into New York State, and then reenter Vermont on to the road which leads to their farm. As I slowly traveled down the narrow dirt road, which was heavily overgrown with brush, something caught my eye. It was protruding over the top of a clump of dense sumac and grape vines. 'No, it can't be,' I said to myself as I backed up. However, there was no mistake, it surely was a smoke stack.

So I got out of my car, walked over to the dense growth of brush, and yet it wasn't more than three feet from the edge of the road. The boom was missing, but the rest was relatively complete. The boiler, water tank, three steam engines, drive gears, and levers were still inside the wooden cab. However, all of the gauges, piping, and associated parts were gone. The unit was tipped slightly down hill, with the roadside track having settled about five inches below grade, and the field side track was almost ten inches below grade.

I continued along to the farm. John Galick answered my knocks at the door. John is the oldest of the brothers at 94. He suggested that I talk with Steven (age 86) concerning the trucks. Steve was out in the barn yard. I found Steve, wearing soiled coveralls, with his hands covered with grease. He had been repairing some piece of machinery. He told me that they did have a chain driven truck. It was a 1913 Chicago Pneumatic. However, they had used its two cylinder engine for their motor boat back in the 30's. The only remaining parts of the Chicago were the front wheels.

Mark Des Meules_4
4/16/2010 3:08:12 PM

Regarding the Galick Brothers. Where did their steam shovel end up. Is it displayed somewhere today? I have some very nice photographs of the steam shovel as it sat on the road side if anyone would like copies. I loved reading the story of extracting the shovel. It brought back many good memories of that place. Did you know that the entire Galick Farm is now preserved forever! Steve Tony and Bill are all gone. I also have video interviews of Steve and Tony talking about building the road and other things.


Mark Des Meules_4
4/16/2010 3:08:09 PM

Regarding the Galick Brothers. Where did their steam shovel end up. Is it displayed somewhere today? I have some very nice photographs of the steam shovel as it sat on the road side if anyone would like copies. I loved reading the story of extracting the shovel. It brought back many good memories of that place. Did you know that the entire Galick Farm is now preserved forever! Steve Tony and Bill are all gone. I also have video interviews of Steve and Tony talking about building the road and other things.


Mark Des Meules_4
4/16/2010 3:01:10 PM

Regarding the Galick Brothers. Where did their steam shovel end up. Is it displayed somewhere today? I have some very nice photographs of the steam shovel as it sat on the road side if anyone would like copies. I loved reading the story of extracting the shovel. It brought back many good memories of that place. Did you know that the entire Galick Farm is now preserved forever! Steve Tony and Bill are all gone. I also have video interviews of Steve and Tony talking about building the road and other things.