THE GOLDEN ROLL


| July/August 1979



W. ADAIR ORR, JR., Born May 1, 1903 died March 1, 1979. Thoroughly emeshed in steam while growing up near Dundee, New York, his father was a locomotive engineer and later a farmer. While a teenager, he ran a pump house for the railroad and later, was engineer at a small power plant for the town of Dundee. He assisted his father in running a steam roller for the county and did some threshing with steam. He attended Bliss Electrical School in Washington, D.C. and after working for Pratt and Whitney, Aircraft in East Hartford, Connecticut, during World War II, he became an electrical contractor in East Hampton, New York, Although not a collector himself, he liked to work on and run the steam and gas engines collected by his son. His last project was restoring a Nott Steam Fire Engine with an American La France front drive conversion for the East Hampton Fire Department. Mr. Orr was a Mason and a volunteer fireman for 58 years. He was a man of extremely good common sense.

Submitted by Francis A. Orr, 1617 32nd Street, Anacenter, Washington 98221.

ROGER GARLICK, 81, of Huron, South Dakota passed away on March 4, 1979 after a lingering illness. He was a long-time subscriber to the Iron Men Album and eagerly awaited each new issue. Roger was a machinist with the C. & N.W. R.R. and retired after 40 years of service. He loved to display and operate his 20-40 oil pull and 40 HP Case steamer at the Pioneer Acres Show, DeSmet, South Dakota and at Prairie Village, Madison, South Dakota, where he was a founding board member. He was voted Pioneer King in 1976. He will be missed by his many friends throughout the Midwest.

Submitted by Jim Johnson, Huron, South Dakota 57350.

LEWIS A. RINEHOLT, a resident of Vicksburg, Michigan for 21 years, passed on at the age of 81 on January 23, 1979. Born in Centreville, Michigan on January 17, 1898, he served his country during World War I in the Army balloon observation corps and was a fireman on the Grand Trunk Railroad. Lew always claimed to have crankcase oil running through his veins and retained his interest in live steam engines.

In 1957, just before his retirement from the National Biscuit Company, he purchased his 13 ton A. D. Baker engine, built in Swanton, Ohio in 1910. The following years were happily spent exercising 'Old Asthma' at nearby steam shows, parades, and exhibitions. She was fitted with rubber lugs on the wheels so she could be driven on paved roads. He also had a collection of stationary engines at home, but the big Baker engine was his pride and joy and he took great pleasure in being invited as a regular exhibitor at the Centreville Fair and the Kalamazoo Nature Center to put 'Asthma' through her paces.