THE GOLDEN ROLL


| March/April 1976



HOMER F. HOLP, of Arlington, Ohio died September 18, 1975. He lived his entire life in the area, having been a superintendent of the Parish and Arlington cemetery for 32 years and a custom thresherman in the area since 1919. He was a trustee of the National Threshers Association since its founding and a Vice President of the Darke County Threshers Association. He was a member of the Brookville Church of the Brethren.

Homer purchased his first engine, a 16 HP Gaar Scott in 1919. This engine was used until the early 20's when it was replaced by a 16 HP Advance. This later engine is still in the family and is owned by his grandson, Scott. Later an 18 HP Advance Rumely replaced the 16 Advance and was used thru his last run in 1955. The work consisted mainly of threshing, shredding, hulling and tobacco bed steaming. Homer owned and repaired many engines, but the three engines mentioned above were his stand-bys. His favorite threshing outfit was a 16 HP Advance engine and a 32' Case separator.

In later years, Homer restored a number of engines and other threshing equipment, among which was the Case hand fed agitator separator that the late Rev. Elmer Ritzman worked his way through theological seminary with. All these jobs were immaculate! He found time to weave threads of perfection into a busy life. Many a traveler on Route 40, the writer included, has stopped at Holps Steam Engine Haven for a refreshing visit with Homer. These visits are now cherished memories of a man whose tread was light, but whose tracks were great.

As the body was being interred, Sam Myers, some half mile distance from the cemetery, signaled the end of a working day on the whistle of his Keck-Gonnerman engine. The sound of that whistle seemed to depict the life of a man who lived and loved steam.

Submitted by Lyle Hoffmaster, 1845 Marion Road, Bucyrus, Ohio 44820.

LLOYD YOUNG, 55, of Sugar Bush, Wisconsin, died December 5, 1975, at his home. He was a charter member of the Union Threshermen's Club of Symco, Wisconsin. He was one of the founders and a very hard worker of the Symco Show. He could be seen at many shows and events in Wisconsin with one or more of his many prized tractors. Lloyd will be missed by all.