THE LADIES PAGE

COUNTRY ECHOES


| July/August 1970



BRANDON WISCONSIN RR-2 Zip 53919 

It was just one star one star in the last hours before morning as I lay awake looking through my bedroom window. It was framed in the casing of the window as though it was a picture of hope, just for me. And then in a matter of moments it disappeared from my sight. A cloud must have covered it, I assumed, as I waited for its reappearance.

My star did not reappear before I dropped back into a troubled sleep. I dreamed one of those senseless dreams about rushing around looking for something I could not find. The one glimpse of this star had been so reassuring, the chaos so tiring. The face I presented to my husband at 5:30 was not a happy or serene one. He wanted an early breakfast and I was exhausted from battling with a dream. But by the time the combination of these two wore off, just a little, I knew what I must do. I must write this column right away.

Now the sky is clear and blue as I look up at the top of a still leafless tree in late April. From both my bed, and my position at my typewriter I can see only sky. Now the treetop is the picture in the frame. It is all in the way one looks at things it would seem. An occasional bird flutters by. There is even animation in my picture of the morning. But let me tell you what happened four or five years ago in August.

It was one day when I presented a crude and disgusting picture of myself to two of my readers. It was a hot day, unbelievably muggy and hot. I was wearing only two pieces of clothing, one a positive necessity to decency, and the covering of a shorty nighty to complete the scanty ensemble. As noon approached I grabbed a light weight cotton skirt from the closet and covered myself a bit more. Who would come on a day such as this, I reasoned.

When Mr. B came in and saw my attire he promptly pulled off his shirt and sat himself down at the table. This had always been a prohibited act at our house. You didn't come to the table without a shirt. Never. But that day we let it go. It was too hot to argue or fuss.