THE LADIES PAGE


| March/April 1958



Mrs. Margaret

Mrs. Margaret (Fred), Heide 1307 Grant Street, Niles, Michigan, painting a landscape. She has written an interesting article for the Woman's Page. Aunt Lene.

ELMER HAS PERSUADED MRS. THOMAS TO GIVE US AN ARTICLE ON AFRICAN VIOLETS. SHE HAS BONE SO AND WE PROUDLY PRESENT IT. HER TITLE IS RATHER INTRIGUING AUNT LENE

My Vacation

MRS HAROLD THOMAS, R. D. 3, Box 87, Dwight, Illinois

LIKING AFRICAN violets, showing them, meeting people, and giving advice and ideas, and getting to do just that at the Threshers Reunion at Poniac, Illinois, the last few years, is the reason I call it 'My Vacation'. A friend had asked where we were going on our vacation and when told, he asked, 'Do you call that a vacation?' I do and maybe you'd like to know some of the things I tell them.

What a thrill it is when they come back the next year and tell how their violets grew and bloomed, after I answered their questions Some even brought plants and recipes for fertilizer etc., and everyone was happy.

The reason nine out of ten have bad luck is that they keep them too wet. Yes, they need to be wet but like yourself, they don't want wet feet all the time and they need air as well as water at the roots. Having several hundred, it is much easier to water them from the bottom with a hose, from the hot water tap, although they do need to be watered from the top once in a while to wash minerals down to the roots. Let them soak up good and then don't water them unt'l the soil on top feels dry and once in a while the leaves feel a little withered. Fertilize once a month.

They are grown in basement under fluorescent lights. and are on a timer being on 14 hours and off 10 hours a day. They are set in large pans sixteen inches below lights in a frame made by my husband and son from an old wind-mill tower. The pans have a drain at one end and a device to raise one end so they will drain well.