The Ladies Page


| March/April 1961



Country Echoes

MAE BABER, R.D.2, Brandon, Wisconsin

Winter will soon be here again and with it seems to come the urge for many of the ladies to settle down at their sewing machines. I can't say mine is easy to settle down to though. If ever there is an antique it is my sewing machine. Back in 1933 when I said a relieved 'I DO' to the most important guy in my life I found myself in need of one of them-there gadgets. Now that I had finally collared the fellow and we had a home of our own it must have a sewing machine.

Our bedroom equipment had come with us (we were both the last of our resident tribes the two youngest brats) and we were helped out with the furniture - amid tears yes. After happily spending what we could afford on some new furniture we found ourselves with twenty dollars we could spare. An old Singer we spied. Happily we toted it home. Oh! The pieces it has sewed for us and our six lively offspring is quite amazing! How they grew, and we did too only crosswise.

Last winter as the din and the clatter diminished I decided again to make my beloved some pajamas a custom I had neglected in the years of too many mouths to feed. I had my original pattern and my original man, but somewhere in between he had gathered thirty pounds. 'Twant in the height', says I as I lay my pattern on blue plaid flannel, six foot three, two hundred and forty pounds, how much do I pull over my pattern? I gave a gentle tug and another gentle tug until I concluded they would encompass him easily. I sewed up the seams, held them up for inspection and here I collapsed, helpless with laughter into the nearest chair. Surely, THIS was for the Tent and Awning Company. I hemmed the bottoms, put elastic in the waistband and hoped that this would modify their size at least a little. But I shall let you in on a secret. Family tension can always be relieved when Father walks out in his pajamas. The children went into stitches at first, however, the dryer has shrunk them a little and we have grown accustomed to the looks of them, but so help me, when I sew this winter I shall go easy on the tugs or buy a new pattern. He admits, grudgingly, that they are very comfortable.

In the meantime, where is that man? The belt on my sewing machine needs a piece taken out of it worse than his steam engine needs an overhauling. 'And bring the oil can, dear, in comparison to my sewing machine your steam engine is an infant!'