The Ladies Page

COUNTRY ECHOES


| March/April 1975



As the year, 1974, was drawing its final curtains of history over its troubled self, there was a day I set me down to do some meditating. Because I was created with a contemplative mind, now and again I have to take time for this. If I don't I become frustrated.

I had been writing Christmas notes and letters, for days. They were climbing toward the hundred mark. Friends had almost become burdensome to me. And never do I want to feel that friends are a burden. They are precious, exceedingly precious. I sighed as I picked up another card, and tried to set the wheels in my head to turning again. And then IT HAPPENED!

This particular card portrayed all the special joys of the Christmas season . . . the Baby Jesus in the manger, Mary, Joseph, The Star, Choirs of Angels. There were others as well. . . holly, poinsettias, colored lights, pine boughs and cones, Christmas trees. The list seemed endless.

Through all of these glowed the face of friendship. And with tremendous impact I came to the realization that for the Christian FRIENDS ARE FOREVER. This, my dear readers, is an eternal relationship. We may stand by gravesides weeping, but if both the deceased and the remaining trust in the eternal truth of Christ it is only temporary.

While I knew that the manger birth foreshadowed the cross it never had come home to me with such emphasis before. It may well have been the difficult experiences of the past months for which I needed reassurance. But it surely came, pressed down and running over. God is so good!

During October and November bad news came crashing at us as though it would never end. It began with the accident I wrote about in the last column. As I write this, our eldest son, Paul, is still undergoing cobalt treatments for Hodgkins Disease, or cancer of the lymph glands. He and his family live two thousand miles from us, which doesn't help. His spleen was removed during October as a precautionary measure. He was dreadfully sick. Doctors are hopeful of a complete cure, but only time will tell. There are two daughters, fifteen and thirteen.