The Marine Engineers of the STEAM SHIP TITANIC


| January/February 1995



R.D. #2, Box 195, Acadia Drive Magnolia, Ohio 44643-9621

Back in 1907, Cunard Line built two giant ocean liners, Mauritania and Lusitania. This put a great strain on the White Star Line. So White Star came up with a design for two ships 1 times larger than any ship of that time. They were named Olympic and Titanic. Later a third sister was added. Her name was Britanic.

The middle sister was to become one of the greatest sea disasters of all time. On her maiden voyage, the RMS Titanic grazed an iceberg for 300 feet, opening 12 square feet to the ice cold ocean. Consequently, the water overcame the pumps, and she sank, taking with her 1,523 human lives. On board were 2,228 lives1,324 passengers and 904 crew members. She was certified to carry 3,547 and had seating in all her life boats for 1,876.

Far below her fine living area was the living part of the Titanic. She had 29 boilers, 25 double-end and 4 single-end, and 186 furnaces hand fired by some 360 stokers. The 25 double-ended boilers were to provide steam for the main engines.

These were reciprocating type consisting of four cylinders, each being triple expansion, one high pressure 54' diameter, one intermediate pressure of 84' diameter, and two low pressure each 97' in diameter. All had a common stroke of 75'. These two monsters could turn 76 RPM and produced 15,000 SHP each. These weighed in at 920 tons each, and turned the wing propellers.

After the steam did its work on these engines, it exhausted into a low pressure steam turbine that turned the center propeller at 165 RPM at 16,000 SHP. This combination gave Titanic an economical 46,000 SHP, and she could cruise at 21 knots. Not bad for a ship with 46,329 gross tons and 34 foot draft.