THE STEAM SHOW ANTIQUE ACRES 1969


| July/August 1970



Phoenix Logger

Smolik Bros. Phoenix Logger mired down in stubble field.

Andy Fischels

Vice-President Antique Acres, Hiway 218 North, Route No.1,Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613.

Our Steam Show at Antique Acres in 1969, was in one way Blessed and in another way not quite so Blessed. Our oats harvest was the best we ever had. This was a Blessing. On Labor Day weekend, we almost got rained out. This was not so Blessed. We also found, that a 3 weekend show is not all it is cracked up to be, because it costs more to do it this way and it spreads the crowds thinner. Live and Learn.

Our show for 1970 will be Labor Day weekend, September 4, 5, 6, and 7, and we hope we are again Blessed with a good harvest. We had a lot of rain during 1969. This was good for the crops but had other disadvantages. Due to a high water table from an adjacent pond, we had soft spots where we wanted to put on our plowing demonstration. During the first weekend, Mr. Ami Slindy and Mr. Marlin Hilhouse, took Ed and Ray Smolik's 110 Case and 14 bottom plow out and gave a plowing demonstration with no problem, outside of heading crooked across the field. When asked about this, Mr. Hill house, who was steering, said he got his pants caught in the power steering. He said he had to reverse the Mackanison and go crooked to get his pants out. Ha! Ha!

On Saturday of the 2nd weekend, Mr. Ray Smolik and Marlin Hilhouse again took the 110 Case and 14 bottom plow out and did they ever get stuck, and I mean but good! After a number of trips and a lot of advice, it was decided to bring a 60 Cat. and a Phoenix logger out to use as cable anchors and attach cables to the drivers of the case and let it pull itself out over the cables. The idea was a good one with the exception that the logger went down on one side, almost to the point of tipping over. So we had a change of plans and had to bring the cat. over to get the logger out. With a lot of digging, a lot of timbers, and the cat to keep it from tipping and pull at the same time, we finally got it on the timbers and solid ground. Now back to the Case. When we got the Cat. and the logger in position in front of the 110 Case and the cables all in place, the first try was made. Mr. Smolik grabbed the throttle, applied the power and she walked out on the left side but almost at once went down on the right side, mud and water oozing out around the right rear wheel. This meant we had to start all over again. For the next try however, we brought a lot of 2 x 6 timbers to let it walk out on. After all was ready for the second try more problems. The 110 Case would not pull the 'hat off your head.' You should have heard all the reasons given for this; none of which were, correct.

Mr. Arni Slindy finally arrived on the scene and in about a half a minute diagnosed that the governor valve came loose on the stem and dropped down, shutting off the steam from the steam chest. Taking the top off the governor proved this to be correct. A piece of wire was found and a hook fashioned, the valve retrieved, a new nut obtained, and the valve refastened to the stem and the top of the governor replaced.

In the meantime, Mr. Derwood Heine hooked his International Cat to the front of the Case to keep the front end straight. When all was ready Mr. Smolik gave the high sign, opened the throttle on the 110 and out she went on top of the timbers. There stood one awful good 110 Case, high and dry on top of the timbers. While all this was going on, the girls in the magazine sales booth had a brilliant idea. They made a sign and put it on the 110 Case. The sign read in large letters 'Mudmobile.' Then to add insult to injury they clipped off the bottom half of Ray Smolik's Engineer badge, and told him he was only a half of an Engineer.