Thrashin' Day


| September/October 1969

  • Binder
    A strip of grain was left to be cut with the binder on Threshing Day. Everyone pitched in to set the bundles into shocks.
  • Mrs. Clara Freeland
    Mrs. Clara Freeland brings materials to demonstrate the old-time art of quilting. Churning, knitting, cider making and sheep shearing were also demonstrated.
  • Half-scale steam engine
    Merritt Mathews half-scale steam engine really worked to power the smaller separator. Old-timers were in their glory, recalling the old days. There was no lack of help for the threshing.
  • Mark McCarty's engine
    Mark McCarty's engine, in perfect working order, brings back memories for visitors in 1967.
  • Patient horses
    The patient horses quickly adjusted to the accustomed noises of the machinery and the crowd.
  • Stack
    The man who builds the stack has a painstaking, itchy, dirty but very necessary job!
  • Antique rig
    Wood, to use in the old range for cooking the threshers dinner, was buzzed up on Clayton Uhl's antique rig.
  • Antique fork
    An antique fork did an excellent job of forking straw.
  • Separator
    A second separator an antique model, with a conveyor table instead of the blower was brought and used.
  • Clinton Manwell
    Something new has been added! Clinton Manwell has been working his ox team for months, preparing them for duty on Threshing Day.

  • Binder
  • Mrs. Clara Freeland
  • Half-scale steam engine
  • Mark McCarty's engine
  • Patient horses
  • Stack
  • Antique rig
  • Antique fork
  • Separator
  • Clinton Manwell

417 Brown Road, Mayville, Michigan 48744

Ruth Uhl demonstrates carding and spinning wool on her antique spinning wheel.

Since our eldest son subscribed to The Iron Men Magazine for my husband, and the first issue arrived about three weeks ago, I have had no peace! Clinton insists that I must write to you about the annual 'happening' here on our old-fashioned 40-acre farm. So being a dutiful wife (at least part of the time) I'll try to get everything in that my husband will expect me to tell.

First, I must explain that everything that has happened was accidental. We don't live from the farm. Clinton is an attendant nurse at a nearby State Hospital to provide a living for our large family. But he was born and raised on the farm, and his first love is farming - in the old fashioned way. He just could not see going into debt to have a few acres of grain combined by a neighbor. And when a friend, who was moving into town, offered him the old grain separator that he used to thresh with years ago, he accepted it gratefully. Then very shortly, our daughter-in-law's father had a grain binder in almost perfect condition which he offered for sale. Of course, Clinton bought it! Going through our small village on the way home with it, our funeral director, Lloyd Black-more (also an ex-farm boy) followed him home.



'What', demanded Lloyd, 'are you going to do with that?'

'Thresh my oats', Clinton answered logically.



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