To Certify a Tractor Boiler

What You Have To Do In Southern California


| March/April 1995



Picture of Harvesting

Tim Sollman

P.O. Box 10264 Burbank, California 91510

This article started out as a story about a Case steam tractor but turned into an essay on what we here in Southern California have to do to get a tractor boiler certified. The Case steam tractor is located at the Early Day Gas Engine and Tractor Museum in Vista, California.

Let me start at the beginning.

We at the museum in Vista have had a Case 60 HP steamer for a long time, but it has not been run in seven or eight years. She was over-fired for a few years and left with her nose dirty. When last put up, the boiler was full of water and the flues were leaking. The end result has been that the ash and water combined, and over the last number of years the rivets in the nose have been rusting away.

About five years ago, I got involved with steam tractors here in Vista. At that time none were running but we now have an Advance and a Russell operating at our shows and we are working on the Case. Here in Southern California, as in other places, we are required to have our boilers certified by the state. Here however, the difference is that it will usually take a year or so to certify each tractor! This is, in part, because our insurance inspector and our state inspector had not ever seen a steam tractor before. When we asked what was needed to get certification it took not less than six months to get a two-page letter from the state capital listing the requirements for certification. Here are some of the requirements they asked for:

1. A complete set of drawings including vessel joint details and any internal and external attachments.