What's For Dinner?


| July/August 1989



Box 207 Perry, MO 63462

Often I think back when I was a child threshing day was a time we children all looked forward to. The coming of the threshing machine, it was like a circus coming to town. You could hear it for miles the steel wheels crunching the gravel roads. Most times this took place in the early hours of the morning, around sun up. That meant the old wood cook stove was in for a workout. The meat had to be on to cook. Pies and cakes had to be baked. The neighbor women and girls who were old enough to help would all gather and start preparing the meal for that day.

In our neighborhood the thresher-man was Mr. Bill Timerberg. He had a 19 HP Keck-Gonnerman engine #1847 and a separator of the same make. Bill was an excellent threshing man. Kept the machinery in top shape at all times.

On one particular morning, about sunrise, as usual the whistle on #1847 sounded and he was heading for the Clarence Graue farm, near Mineolo, Missouri, a distance of about 3 miles. The whistle prompted Mrs. Graue to check her kitchen for supplies, and she needed a few things from the store.

They had a 1929 Chevrolet that was nearly new, which was always kept in the garage. They also had a pair of goats. Upon Mr. Graue's return from the store, he parked the car under the shade tree, took his wife the kitchen supplies, and went out to the barn to get some sacks ready for seed wheat.

I am sure if Mr. Graue were alive today he wouldn't object to my telling this. While he was at the barn, the goats took a tour on top of his car, which resulted in the top having to be replaced. Upon noticing this, Billy Goat Gruff and his girl friend Nonnie suddenly became candidates to furnish the meat for the threshing dinner. By then, a couple of neighbors had shown up to help thresh.