Why, Why, do old engineers come back every year?


| May/June 1970



436 N. Library

(This is a report that should have been put in long ago. Mr. Dugan sent us pictures and this report in separate envelopes. I never received the pictures. The report was made up and sent to the printers and was to be in March-April 69 issue. As sometimes happens, in all businesses it has been lost. I had to write and get another copy from the man. It deals with the summer of 1968, but here are other stories in it from long ago and it is interesting and I think you all will enjoy it.)

Waterloo, Illinois 62298 My 19th annual trip to the Midwest Old Settler's Reunion at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, and the Northwest I enjoyed more than all other trips, and it seems to get better every year. On August 24, 1968, I packed my suitcase and got my aero- plane ready for take-off. Sunday morning, August 25, I went to church with my wife and came home for breakfast. My wife took me out to the airport, and I warmed up my little T-Craft. I kissed my wife and said, 'I will see you when the show is over.' I took off, circled the airport, climbed to 4500 feet, and headed my little ship 335° for Mt. Pleasant. After flying over St. Louis, Quincy, and Keokuk, in two hours I circled McMillian Park and set down at Mt. Pleasant Airport. I taxied up to the gas pump and the airport manager (a very courteous fellow) came out. He filled my plane with gas and helped me tie it down for the reunion duration. Then he said to me, 'I will take you into town.' Right here is where the good old hospitality of Mt. Pleasant started to burst out.

He drove me to Mrs. Charles Volmer, who lives just across the street from the main gate of McMillian Park. I have been staying with her for the past years a very nice person, indeed. After paying my room rent and unpacking, I went over to the park.

All the engines were pulled out and filled with water, just waiting for their masters to fire them up. There, among them was Wm. 0. Sater's 20 hp. Return Flue Avery, which I always run. I said to myself, 'Old Boy, I will fire up in the morning.' There weren't too many people around as yet. I met a few of the old timers including Mr. Conrad, who runs the Under-mounted Reeves. We went into town for dinner at the little lunch counter across from the court house a fine place to eat. Then we returned to the park and spent the afternoon meeting the old timers coming in. I could feel the air pollution getting thicker.

Monday morning came, and I steamed up the old Avery and groomed her for the show. Tuesday morning came, and so did Oliver Rehg, from Meadville, Pa. I could notice the air was more polluted than ever. Oliver Rehg is the fellow who was running McMillian's Case engine. The water tender was leaking and upon examination he found a yellow jacket's nest in the corner of the tank. He claimed they stung holes in it. Now, that I still don't believe.