Answers to May 2010 Mystery Tools

What-Is-It?

| July 2010

  • A. No answers were sent by readers and we’re stumped too. Photo submitted by John Crombe, Rochester, N.Y.
    A. No answers were sent by readers and we’re stumped too. Photo submitted by John Crombe, Rochester, N.Y.
    Photo submitted by John Crombe, Rochester, N.Y.
  • B. No answers were sent by readers; we’ve no idea what this is. Photo submitted by Mike Boehmer, Devil’s Lake, N.D.
    B. No answers were sent by readers; we’ve no idea what this is. Photo submitted by Mike Boehmer, Devil’s Lake, N.D.
    Photo submitted by Mike Boehmer, Devil’s Lake, N.D.
  • C. Wire fence gate fastener. Patent 964,056: Wire fence gate fastener patented by Axel N. Sandquist, Belgrade, Mont., July 12, 1910.
    C. Wire fence gate fastener. Patent 964,056: Wire fence gate fastener patented by Axel N. Sandquist, Belgrade, Mont., July 12, 1910.
    Patent 964,056
  • C. Wire fence gate fastener. No correct answers were received from readers. Photo submitted by Chad Winegard, Muscatine, Iowa. See patent 964,056.
    C. Wire fence gate fastener. No correct answers were received from readers. Photo submitted by Chad Winegard, Muscatine, Iowa. See patent 964,056 (next image).
    Photo submitted by Chad Winegard, Muscatine, Iowa
  • D. Boring machine from the Hart Manufacturing Company catalog.
    D. Boring machine from the Hart Manufacturing Company catalog.
    Hart Manufacturing Company catalog
  • D. Boring machine. Patent 22,379: Boring machine patented by George F. Rice, Worcester, Mass., Dec. 21, 1858.
    D. Boring machine. Patent 22,379: Boring machine patented by George F. Rice, Worcester, Mass., Dec. 21, 1858.
    Patent 22,379
  • D. Boring machine. “My uncle built timber-framed barns in the very early 1900s and used a drill like the one pictured (I still have it) to drill or auger holes in timber for the wooden pins to be driven into,” writes Bernard Geisel. “You would put the correct size bit in for the size of wooden pin, set the machine on the timber, sit on the tail and turn the handles. It was a must for timber barn framing.” Photo submitted by George Benge, Jamestown, Ind. See patent 22,379 for a similar piece.
    D. Boring machine. “My uncle built timber-framed barns in the very early 1900s and used a drill like the one pictured (I still have it) to drill or auger holes in timber for the wooden pins to be driven into,” writes Bernard Geisel. “You would put the correct size bit in for the size of wooden pin, set the machine on the timber, sit on the tail and turn the handles. It was a must for timber barn framing.” Photo submitted by George Benge, Jamestown, Ind. See patent 22,379 for a similar piece (next image). 
    Photo submitted by George Benge, Jamestown, Ind.

  • A. No answers were sent by readers and we’re stumped too. Photo submitted by John Crombe, Rochester, N.Y.
  • B. No answers were sent by readers; we’ve no idea what this is. Photo submitted by Mike Boehmer, Devil’s Lake, N.D.
  • C. Wire fence gate fastener. Patent 964,056: Wire fence gate fastener patented by Axel N. Sandquist, Belgrade, Mont., July 12, 1910.
  • C. Wire fence gate fastener. No correct answers were received from readers. Photo submitted by Chad Winegard, Muscatine, Iowa. See patent 964,056.
  • D. Boring machine from the Hart Manufacturing Company catalog.
  • D. Boring machine. Patent 22,379: Boring machine patented by George F. Rice, Worcester, Mass., Dec. 21, 1858.
  • D. Boring machine. “My uncle built timber-framed barns in the very early 1900s and used a drill like the one pictured (I still have it) to drill or auger holes in timber for the wooden pins to be driven into,” writes Bernard Geisel. “You would put the correct size bit in for the size of wooden pin, set the machine on the timber, sit on the tail and turn the handles. It was a must for timber barn framing.” Photo submitted by George Benge, Jamestown, Ind. See patent 22,379 for a similar piece.

To view images of all four May 2010 mystery tools and accompanying patent illustrations, click the Image Gallery link to the right.

A. No answers were sent by readers and we’re stumped too. Photo submitted by John Crombe, Rochester, N.Y.

B. No answers were sent by readers; we’ve no idea what this is. Photo submitted by Mike Boehmer, Devil’s Lake, N.D.

C. Wire fence gate fastener. No correct answers were received from readers. Photo submitted by Chad Winegard, Muscatine, Iowa. See patent 964,056.



D. Boring machine, as identified by Ken Hunter, Allerton, Ill.; Bill Carter, Lansing, Mich.; Stephen Clemens, Mazeppa, Minn.; Bob Wittersheim, Carleton, Mich.; Roy Archibald, Leavenworth, Ind.; Ralph Najarian, Manhattan, Kan.; Glenn Thompson, Penn Yan, N.Y.; Robert E. Bearor, Rutland, Vt.; Lyle W. Fallang, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bernard Geisel, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.; Raymond Garbee, Billings, Mo.; Robert Caton; Jack Revie, Kennan, Wis.; Robert C. Palte, Ottawa, Ohio; Julius Firmin, Hopedale, Ma.; Thad Heimburg, East Aurora, N.Y.; Ralph Najarian, Manhattan, Kan.; Clarence A. Buck, El Paso, Ill.; and Willard Ottman, Lemmon, S.D.

“My uncle built timber-framed barns in the very early 1900s and used a drill like the one pictured (I still have it) to drill or auger holes in timber for the wooden pins to be driven into,” writes Bernard Geisel. “You would put the correct size bit in for the size of wooden pin, set the machine on the timber, sit on the tail and turn the handles. It was a must for timber barn framing.” Photo submitted by George Benge, Jamestown, Ind. See patent 22,379 for a similar piece.