Answers to January 2010 Mystery Tools

What-Is-It?

| March 2010

  • This might be a balance used to weigh cotton bags in the fields
    A. We can’t identify this piece. However, Galynn Ferris, Spring, Texas, speculates this might be a balance used to weigh cotton bags in the fields.
    Photo submitted by George Briggs
  • Ash basket or grate
    B. Ash basket/grate.
    Photo submitted by Fred Watterson
  • Automobile jack
    C. Automobile jack. See patent 876,824 for this jack (next image).
    Photo submitted by Keith Carr
  • The patent drawing for this automobile jack (patented by Joseph J. Kelleher, Waterloo, Iowa, Feb. 23, 1915) clearly shows the intended function
    C. The patent drawing for this automobile jack (patented by Joseph J. Kelleher, Waterloo, Iowa, Feb. 23, 1915) clearly shows the intended function.
    Patent 1,129,494
  • Automobile jack patented by Joseph Calvin Moore
    C. Automobile jack patented by Joseph Calvin Moore, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Jan. 14, 1908.
    Patent 876,824
  • Lineman's climbing iron
    D. Lineman’s climbing iron. See patent 1,632,688 for a similar item (next image).
    Photo submitted by Alan Johnson
  • Lineman's climbing iron patented by Wagna Allahverdian
    D. Lineman’s climbing iron patented by Wagna Allahverdian, Utica, N.Y., June 14, 1927.
    Patent 1,632,688

  • This might be a balance used to weigh cotton bags in the fields
  • Ash basket or grate
  • Automobile jack
  • The patent drawing for this automobile jack (patented by Joseph J. Kelleher, Waterloo, Iowa, Feb. 23, 1915) clearly shows the intended function
  • Automobile jack patented by Joseph Calvin Moore
  • Lineman's climbing iron
  • Lineman's climbing iron patented by Wagna Allahverdian

To view images of all four January 2010 mystery tools and accompanying patent illustrations, click the Image Gallery link to the right.

A. We can’t identify this piece. However, Galynn Ferris, Spring, Texas, speculates this might be a balance used to weigh cotton bags in the fields. Photo submitted by George Briggs, New Braintree, Mass.

B. Ash basket/grate, as identified by Jim Horton, Corydon, Iowa; George Fogle, Mason, Mich.; Mike Obach, Belfield, N.D.; Marvin Young, Lakeville, Ohio; and Kenneth Waits, Rushville, Ind. “It’s the basket or grate to a cowboy-cowgirl tank heater. They were made of cast iron and were self-sinking,” Jim says. “They were heavy enough to stay put without being fastened down, and would burn anything from coal to corn cobs.” George Fogle adds that the basket sat on top of a closed ash container in the bottom of the heater, allowing a draft. Marlin O. Herbst, Merrill, Iowa, has a different idea. “It could be the basket from an old-time egg-washing machine.” Photo submitted by Fred Watterson, Caldwell, Idaho.

C. Automobile jack, as identified by Don Schroeder, Berger, Mo.; Roy Parmeter, Duncans Mills, Calif.; and Wendell D. Dillavou, Aledo, Ill. This jack is one from a set of four. The jack was particularly useful in storage of early cars, an easy alternative to putting the car on and off blocks. Photo submitted by Keith Carr, Prairie City, S.D. See patent 876,824 for this jack.



D. Lineman’s climbing iron, as identified by Marlin O. Herbst. Photo submitted by Alan Johnson, Lake Mills, Iowa. See patent 1,632,688 for a similar item.