Case Tractor Connection

A Minnesota man builds a Case tractor collection around boyhood memories.


| July 2017



Case 930 Standard diesel

Steve Ringen’s Case 930 Standard diesel looks similar to his 930 Comfort King.

Photo by Bill Vossler

It was inevitable that Steve Ringen would get involved with old tractors at some point in his life. He grew up on a farm, and that accounts for part of his interest in old iron. But the fact that the family farm was adjacent to the grounds of the Butterfield (Minnesota) Steam & Gas Engine Show was an equally important factor.

“I loved farming and helping Dad doing stuff, and I always thought a lot of those older tractors were neat,” he says. “Plus, we lived right next to the threshing show. I got interested that way.”

Steve’s dad had a 1951 Case DC and a 1942 Case SC that father and son used for cultivating. “Dad would cultivate four rows with the DC, and leave two rows for me,” he says. “After he made a round, I would use the SC to do two rows, so we had a six-row cultivating method. That’s how I got started, when I was probably 11 years old.”

A few years later, Steve saw a 1947 SC for sale and bought it. “After that, I kept buying tractors every year or two when I had some extra money,” he says. “I also started getting plows and other implements, because I wanted to plow at the Butterfield show. It’s no fun having your stuff just sitting there. The fun is in the driving, so we have 10 acres of the threshing bee’s land set aside to plow every year, with an acre for horses to plow, too.”

Old iron with bling

Strips of chrome on the hoods give a pair of Case tractors in Steve’s collection a special shine. The tractors – a 1941 Case LA and 1941 Case SC narrow front – are among the last of Case’s pre-war tractors to sport chrome trim. In 1942, Case discontinued use of the gleaming metal in support of the war effort.

When Steve got a chance to buy the 1941 Case SC, he didn’t hesitate. But the chrome trim wasn’t the only thing that attracted his interest. The 1941 model was the only Case SC with an exhaust pipe in the center of the hood. “They discovered that it was in the way for planting,” he says, “so the next year it was moved off to the side, so you could see the planting mark.”