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5/22/2015

April 2015 Mystery Tool A

April 2015 Mystery Tool A

A. Beading implement used on tubes/flues in steam engines. Identified by Stephen Clemens, Mazeppa, Minnesota; Dick Kates, Oakland, Iowa; and Mike Garross, Beach Park, Illinois. “The round part in the middle goes in one tube and the far left one goes in the tube that you want to bead,” Mike says. “Beading is the rolling over of the end of the tube. Each time the hammer is raised, it turns the beading tool a small amount. Keep hitting until you have gone all the way around the tube. It will take several passes around to complete the beading.” Photo submitted by John Krock, Kenton, Ohio.

 

April 2015 Mystery Tool B

April 2015 Mystery Tool B

A. Unidentified. Photo submitted by Virgil Cassill via email.

 

April 2015 Mystery Tool C

April 2015 Mystery Tool C

A. Unidentified. Photo submitted by Ben and Sandra Swope, Ashley, Ohio.

 

April 2015 Mystery Tool D

April 2015 Mystery Tool D

A. No definitive answer. Kenny Payne, Irvington, Kentucky, believes this to be a belt-driven tachometer. Dick Kates and Marlin Herbst, Merrill, Iowa, believe it to be a specialized governor. Photo submitted by Clarence Gibbs, Inman, South Carolina.

April 2015 Mystery Tool D

 

April 2015 Mystery Tool E

April 2015 Mystery Tool E

A. Chain used in rotary cement kilns. Identified by Michael Janis, Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and Barry Jones, Monroe, Michigan. “It is hung in a tubular kiln, dips into wet slurry and exposes the slurry to hot gas as the kiln rotates,” Michael says. “Several tons of this type of chain are used in the heat exchanger job at the kiln’s feed end. A few years ago, most cement and lime kilns were wet process and used this chain. Some lime kilns still use this chain. When worn chain is removed, it is usually sold for scrap, but on occasion is sold or given to farmers who sometimes use it to break up clods in their fields, much like a set of harrows. The chain is not suitable for structural applications. It has been designed for maximum heat exchange area to evaporate water from feed slurry.” The wet process has been all but abandoned in the U.S., Barry adds. “I worked at what I think was the last plant in Detroit in the 1980s,” he says. “A wet kiln is 600 feet long and 16 feet in diameter. It rotates at about 2-3 rpm, and operates at 2,900 degrees. The kiln is lined with the chains; as it rotates, the chains carry heat down into a liquid slurry of ground limestone, clay and water to heat it and break up chunks as it dries.” Photo submitted by Wilfrid Vittetoe, Washington, Iowa.



5/22/2015

Do you recognize this tool?

June 2015 Mystery Tool A

Cast iron items range in size from 6 to 12 inches (round pieces measure 3-1/2 inches). All are 1-1/2 inches deep. One of the round ones has a set of flanges on either side. No markings.

Find the correct answers in the August 2015 issue of Farm Collector.

Have a tool you want to submit? Email us at editor@farmcollector.com with at least one photo taken in a well-lit area against a plain background. Include dimensions and any markings on the piece.



5/15/2015

Do you recognize this tool?

May 2015 Mystery Tool E

Flat chain sprocket at end. Outside marked "100s 10s units."

Find the correct answers in the July 2015 issue of Farm Collector.

Have a tool you want to submit? Email us at editor@farmcollector.com with at least one photo taken in a well-lit area against a plain background. Include dimensions and any markings on the piece.

May 2015 Mystery Tool E



5/8/2015

Do you recognize this tool?

May 2015 Mystery Tool D

May 2015 Mystery Tool D

Measures 4-1/4 inches long and 1-1/2 inches wide. The arms open and close as the slide is moved.

Find the correct answers in the July 2015 issue of Farm Collector.

Have a tool you want to submit? Email us at editor@farmcollector.com with at least one photo taken in a well-lit area against a plain background. Include dimensions and any markings on the piece.



4/30/2015

Do you recognize this tool?

May 2015 Mystery Tool C

Measures about 4-1/2 inches long.

Find the correct answers in the July 2015 issue of Farm Collector.

Have a tool you want to submit? Email us at editor@farmcollector.com with at least one photo taken in a well-lit area against a plain background. Include dimensions and any markings on the piece.



4/16/2015

Do you recognize this tool?

December 2014 Mystery Tool A

Measures about 13 inches wide. Marked “Hodell Chains Patent Pending.”

Find the correct answers in the February 2015 issue of Farm Collector.

Have a tool you want to submit? Email us at editor@farmcollector.com with at least one photo taken in a well-lit area against a plain background. Include dimensions and any markings on the piece.



4/16/2015

October 2014 Mystery Tool A

October 2014 Mystery Tool A

A. Mud lug. Easily strapped on to rear wheel when stuck in mud or snow. See patent 1,309,020. Photo submitted by Kenny Bush, Andalusia, Illinois.

October 2014 Mystery Tool A

Patent no. 1,309,020: Gripping attachment for automobile wheels. Patent granted to Walter Creek, Las Animas, Colo., July 8, 1919.

 

October 2014 Mystery Tool B

October 2014 Mystery Tool B

A. Unidentified. Levi S. Yoder, Middlefield, Ohio, believes it to be a horseshoe remover. “With the jaws opened wide,” he says, “it is squeezed between the shoe and the hoof, squeezed lightly with the handles working back and forth, thus freeing the shoe.” Photo submitted by Richard Bader, Middletown, New York.

 

October 2014 Mystery Tool C

October 2014 Mystery Tool B

A. Large sprocket likely from farm equipment such as a manure spreader. Appears that the sprocket was also part of a “slip clutch,” protecting it from an overload and breaking the drive chain or some other part. Identified by Robert Scholz, Elmo, Missouri; Dwight Brown, Wynne, Arkansas; Ronald Gasser, Sterling, Ohio. Photo submitted by Don Chambers, Urbana, Illinois.

 

October 2014 Mystery Tool D

October 2014 Mystery Tool D

A. Turnip krauter. Used in making sauerkraut from turnips rather than cabbage. The small knives beneath the larger blade shredded the turnip to the proper consistency for kraut. Identified by Harry Jones, Brookings, South Dakota; Brett Kaltvedt, Piedmont, South Dakota; Garry Townsley, Sardinia, Ohio; Leonard Keifer, Gaithersburg, Maryland; Fred Aten, Hutchinson, Minnesota; and Richard Raber, Effingham, Illinois. “I have nine in my collection and all vary in style and quality of construction,” Richard says. “The one pictured is a well-made piece compared to many. These were used by settlers of German descent; nothing that they had or grew was wasted. When there was an abundance of turnips, they made turnip kraut or turnip slaw, basically substituting turnips for cabbage. One thing that cannot be seen on the photos is very short vertical knives or blades under the large knife that is visible in the pictures. To use it, cut the top and bottom off a turnip and set it in the middle of the round board. Push the handle down until the four blades shown are pressed into the turnip. Turn the crank and the turnip will be shredded into small strips similar to shoestring potatoes. Note the blade is off center so it cuts as the turnip rotates. The rectangular base would sit on a large crock so the shreds would go directly into the crock for making the kraut.” See patent 579,816 for a similar piece. Photo submitted by Larry Mayer, Jeffersonville, Ohio.

October 2014 Mystery Tool D

Patent no. 579,816: Vegetable cutter. Patent granted to Henry X. Buchmann, St. Louis, Mo., March 30, 1897.

 

October 2014 Mystery Tool E

October 2014 Mystery Tool E

October 2014 Mystery Tool E

A. Unidentified. Photo submitted by Wayne Rowell, Wilmington, Vermont.


Remember This?

June 2014 Mystery Tool E

Walter S. Campbell, Duncannon, Pennsylvania, not only recognized Item E from June 2014: He had one – a mouth speculum for sheep or goats – in his collection, as well as the device used to insert medication into the animal’s mouth. “I watched my father use one years ago,” he says. “Insert the tool loaded with a pill in between the two horizontal bars on the speculum while prying the animal’s mouth open. Squeeze the tongs and the pill drops into the animal’s throat.”





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