First Things

1 / 2
Memories Of A Former Kid
2 / 2

One picture, the old saying notes, is worth a
thousand words. Never has that been more true than in this issue of
Farm Collector, in which we feature five pages of
photographs taken by our readers.

The project was born of necessity: Readers were deputized in
order to help Farm Collector get a broader look at the
shows held coast to coast each year. With your help, we traveled
farther than seemed possible, and saw things in a whole new
way.

We saw original paint on creaking old wooden threshers,
bird’s-eye views of a vast display of Massey equipment, and rear
tire chats. We saw a fabulous series of images of a horse-powered
push header in action against amber fields and impossibly blue
skies. We saw unabashed affection for fellow collectors in warm and
inviting portraits. We saw – and you will, too – pride in American
agriculture, commitment to preservation of a way of life, and the
simple pleasure of a common interest. And we saw smiles – bushels
of smiles.

The only wrinkle we encountered in this project was technology.
When taking photos with a digital camera, if there is any
possibility at all that the photograph will be published,
photographers must adjust their camera settings to the largest size
image possible. Other than that, all went smoothly, and we are
grateful to all who contributed images and information for this
feature.

Just outside my office window, the ground is covered with a
blanket of snow topped by a crusty glaze of sleet. We’re in for the
duration. No matter: I look at the photo on page 18 of a steamer at
sunrise, and I can feel the promise of a hot summer day … the kind
of day sized up before 7 a.m., when one makes hour-by-hour plans
carefully engineered to avoid any overlap of maximum exertion and
maximum temps. Can you feel the humidity? Can you smell the coal
burning? Enjoy a final look at the show season of 2005!

Leslie McManus, Editor
lmcmanus@ogdenpubs.com

Farm Collector Magazine
Farm Collector Magazine
Dedicated to the Preservation of Vintage Farm Equipment