SHOW REPORT

Sec., 1350 South E. Street, Elwood, Indiana

The Elwood Historical Club’s sixth annual ‘Steam
Threshing and Saw-Milling Show’ turned out to be the biggest
and best ever. The event this year was extended an extra day,
making it a four-day event, July 22-25.

The ceremonies started at 10 A.M. Thursday, July 22 with the
playing of the National Anthem. The flag was raised by the Double E
Saddle Club Color Guard on Horseback. Threshing started immediately
after the introductions. In all, fourteen acres of wheat would be
threshed during the four-day event.

There were several large engines on display. They included: A
1924 Keck Gonnerman, 22 horse power engine owned by Harold Wilburn,
Elwood, Indiana. A 1915 Case 65 horse power engine owned by Rudolph
Shinholt, Jonesboro, Indiana. A 1922 Baker 23 Horse power engine
owned by Basil Harvey, Greentown, Indiana. A Case 9 horse power
owned by Davis Sullivan of Markleville, Indiana. A 1923 Minneapolis
25 horse power owned by Berman Warner, Anderson, Indiana. A 1914
Case 80 horse power engine owned by Josiah Zehring, Bennett Switch,
Indiana. A 1907 Case 65 horse power engine owned by Donald Beckom,
Oakford, Indiana. A Kitten Engine owned by Lloyd Sanders, Kokomo,
Indiana. An Advance Rumley 25 horse power owned by Ellis Reavis,
Kokomo, Indiana. A Port Huron 25 horse power engine owned by Vernon
Line-gar, Tipton, Indiana.

Gasoline Tractors on display included: Big Hart-Parr owned by
Earl Sottong, Tipton, Indiana. An Oil Pull, an Old Reliable, and a
10-20 McCormick all owned by the McCloskey Brothers, Young America,
Indiana. Big Hart Parr owned by John Huddleson, Summerset,
Indiana.

Gas Engines on display included: 20 Gas Engines owned by Morris
Titus, Pendelton, Indiana. 2 Gas Engines owned by Beckom’s of
Oak-ford, Indiana.

Other displays were: Horse Drawn Hearse made in 1892. Antique
farm and household equipment owned by Otto VanDoren, Windfall,
Indiana. Tread Mill owned by Scott Campbell, Elwood, Indiana.

Miniature engines included: Case 1/3 Thresher 1/3 owned by
Carter Dalton. Baker owned by Paul Cole, Morristown, Indiana.
Miniature owned by Ralph Shelburn. Minature owned by John Bash,
Greenfield, Indiana. Minature Saw Mill owned by Kem and Ralph
Airey. of a 40 Case owned by W.D. Willis, Attica, Indiana.
Locomobile owned by M.C. Lakes, South Bend, Indiana. Locomobile
owned by C.W. McKinley. Indianapolis, Indiana.

At noon each day Robert Jackley master of ceremonies, gave the
signal for the Old Tin Plate Whistle to be blown, immediately
followingall engines blew their Whistles.

All of the engines were kept busy . at all times to give the
spectators plenty of action. The 32 acre wooded area was filled
with many other displays. The sawmill was in operation all four
days.

For the younger set as well as the older, the miniature railroad
owned by Davis Sullivan of Markleville, Indiana, was back again
this year.

Each year the Historical Society has developed new additions,
some are new and modern restrooms. The show being extended to four
days, the Indiana Horsebreeders Association gave a Draft Horse
Show. This was a very successful addition which will be continued
every year, and a caravan lead by steam engines etc. formed at
Elwood, Indiana, to escort our Lt. Gov. Rock and Mayor Stock-dale
to the grounds for the Lt. Gov. to give a speech which was very
interesting. A small parade of the engines was put on every day at
the grounds.

Meals were served by the Leisure Christian Church and the
Oakford Christian Church. The ladies served a very good selection
of food, and many people took advantage o f these delicious
servings.

Each night of the four-day event there was entertainment in the
big tent.

During the whole four days W.B.M.P. radio station of Elwood
broadcasted the ceremonies to give the people of the surrounding
area, who couldn’t come to join in with the events as they
happened.

Downtown Elwood held Old Fashioned Bargain Days, Friday and
Saturday in accordance with the threshing show. The merchants gave
the citizens a chance to ‘save a few bucks’ on the outside
display bargains.

Church services started the program off on Sunday morning with
the Reverend Stephen Salsbery of Leisure conducting the service. He
is also Chaplain of the Club. The church service was also
broadcasted.

The highlight of Sunday and probably the entire event was the
crowning of the queen. Mrs. Harold Wilburn and Mrs. Rudolph
Shinholt of the ladies auxiliary of the club were responsible for
this outstanding event. The queen is chosen by sales of penny
votes. This year there were thirteen backed by a sponsor.

The candidates were: Roselie Farr, Elwood, Indiana; Anita
Pearson, Elwood, Indiana; Cheryl Lynn Hawkins, Tipton, Indiana;
Pamela Kay Williams, Elwood, Indiana; Sharron Sheedy, Elwood,
Indiana: Colleen Collier, Elwood, Indiana; Vicky Longnecker,
Elwood, Indiana; Roberta Gillam, Elwood, Indiana; Shirley Mclntyre,
Elwood, Indiana; Nancy Sumner, Elwood, Indiana; Judy Sanders,
Elwood, Indiana; Debby Pedro, Elwood, Indiana; Jacky Daugherty,
Elwood, Indiana.

At 4 P.M. Anita Pearson of Elwood, Indiana, was crowned as the
1965 queen. Cheryl Lynn Hawkins of Tipton, Indiana was second and
Jackie Sue Daughtery of Elwood, Indiana was third. Miss Pearson was
crowned by Miss Wenda Gross the 1964 queen. Miss Joan Hinds the
1963 queen presented Miss Pearson with the long stem roses.

Displays not mentioned above were: Antique airplanes by the
Antique Airplane Club of Kokomo, Indiana.

New equipment by the Case and Ford dealers.

A great deal of thanks to the Double E Saddle Club for handling
the parking, taking care of the entrance, and the selling of
tickets. To the Duckcreek Fire Department for being with us at all
times.

As the show drew to a close, as for the most of us we are very
weary, but have enjoyed every minute of it, and every minute of
work put in it was worth it.

A sincere thanks to all the fine people who attended our show
and helped make it possible to have such a successful show.

See all of you next year, same time same place.

Farm Collector Magazine
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